June Is Scoliosis Awareness Month

15 Jun, 2022

June in many parts of the world means warmer weather, summer vacation, and also Scoliosis Awareness Month! Scoliosis Awareness Month is when people around the world raise awareness and money for the common spinal condition of scoliosis. While many of us take our spinal health and skeletal structure for granted, there are many different diseases and conditions that can impact your bones and have a larger implication on your general well-being. This is why it’s essential to have a basic knowledge of how your spine works, holds your body together, and keeps you healthy and active. Read on to learn more about the spine, scoliosis, and various spinal deformities.

What You Should Know About Scoliosis

Scoliosis refers to a specific spinal deformity identified as a lateral curve in the spine. While our spines are naturally curved, scoliosis causes the spine to bend in abnormal ways. This condition can range from mild to severe, and result in anything from mild postural problems to significant chronic pain that requires treatment. Scoliosis typically develops in children around the age of 10-15, although it can occur at any point in a person’s life. Severe scoliosis can be identified by the spinal curvature, but mild scoliosis may not be caught until the child gets older.

Treatment for scoliosis varies depending on the severity of the condition. Typically patients are encouraged to continue normal activity levels since there isn’t any conclusive evidence that evidence impacts the condition. Certain forms of physical therapy, stretching, and exercises may assist in helping with mild scoliosis. For severe cases, back braces may be employed to prevent the curvature from getting worse, and your doctor may recommend surgery to fuse the vertebrae together permanently. Consult with a spinal doctor as well as your primary physician to learn more about what treatment is best for your specific case.

Facts About Spinal Health

In honor of Scoliosis Awareness Month, here are some facts about the human spine that you may not be aware of.

  1. The spine has 120 muscles: There are 640 muscles in the human body. The smallest is the Stapedius, the largest is the Gluteus Maximus, and 20% of them are in the spine. The spine is composed of 100 joints and 220 ligaments.
  2. There are 5 sections in the spine: Cervical, lumbar, thoracic, coccyx, and sacrum.
  3. A quarter of your spine is cartilage: There is a cartilage cushion between each vertebra that expands and contracts as necessary to allow your spine to bend in different directions. You lose height as you get older because these cartilage cushions compress with age.
  4. Humans are the only animals with an S-shaped spine: Due to our unique ability to walk vertically, we are the only animals that have an S-shaped spine. Our spines are designed to counteract the weight of our head and body in an upright column with a curve backward at the top and a curve forwards on the bottom area. 

Contact Us Today

Spinal health is integral to everyday function and our overall well-being. The Spine and Scoliosis Center is a top spinal health clinic in Florida. Call The Spine and Scoliosis Center to make an appointment today. Happy Scoliosis Awareness month!

Anatomy Of The Spine

Anatomy Of The Spine

The spinal column is composed of 33 individual bones, which provide the main support for your body. The spine allows you to stand up, twist, bend, and most while protecting the spinal cord from injury. Every part of your body is impacted by your spine and impacts it...

read more
10 Things You Didn’t Know About Scoliosis

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Scoliosis

Scoliosis is the most common spine deformity that affects adults and children alike. However, being diagnosed with scoliosis doesn’t mean you absolutely need back surgery; there is a range of non-surgical treatment options available, depending on the severity of your...

read more
All About Disc Replacements

All About Disc Replacements

Your intervertebral discs are the invisible cushions of the body; these spongy structures sit between your spinal vertebrae and absorb impact when you move to assist with spinal movement. As we age, our intervertebral discs degenerate and get worn down. This can...

read more

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.